Jul 262013
 

Speed round tonight.  The descriptions all come from the noted websites.

Fluxx the Board Game

“The board game that’s all about change: changing rules, changing goals and now changing tiles. Occupy the right tile spaces to claim the current goal and reveal the next goal… getting you one step closer to victory!”

“It’s more strategic than the original card game and delivers everything you’d expect from a name like Fluxx: The Board Game.  The ever-shifting landscape is made of tiles that can be rotated or uprooted elsewhere on the table.  To win, players must position their pieces on spaces shown on the goal.  Victory requires accomplishing several goals but the exact number needed is subject to change!  Rules changes are tracked on a comprehensive new pegboard.  It’s a game about change where everything can change—from the rules to the gameboard to the color of your pieces!” – www.looneylabs.com

Bushido: Way of the Warrior

“In Bushido: Der Weg des Kriegers (the subtitle means “Way of the Warrior”) players take on the roles of Daimyo, feudal lords in medieval Japan, and compete to become the next shogun of the empire, who gets appointed by the emperor.”

“This game is all about resource management and conflict, but unlike other games in this category you won’t necessarily win, if you conquer the most areas. Your main goal is to earn enough honor, which can be achieved in different ways. There are two kinds of honor. ‘Daimyo-Honor’ is the victory condition and can be directly gained by holding provinces, and indirectly by transforming ‘Samurai-Honor’ at a set rate. ‘Samurai-Honor’ is gained by winning a defensive or offensive battle. It can be transformed into ‘Daimyo-Honor’ with a tea ceremony.” – Board Game Geek

Star Wars LCG: Edge of Darkness expansion

Edge of Darkness is the first deluxe expansion for Star Wars: The Card Game. Its twenty-two new objective sets add 132 total cards that allow players to battle for the fate of the galaxy as either of two new affiliations, the dark side’s Scum and Villainy or the light side’s Smugglers and Spies.”

“Both of these affiliations live at the outskirts of Imperial law, and Edge of Darkness draws heavily from the original Star Wars trilogy as it builds themes centered around the remote planet of Tatooine and the independent mining colony of Cloud City. Edge of Darkness allows you to expand your games of Star Wars with Jawas, Tuskens, bounties, captives, and sabotage. You’ll also find such notable heroes and villains as Chewbacca, Lando Calrissian, Greedo, Bossk, and Jabba the Hutt, and you’ll be able explore unheralded new events within the expanded Star Wars universe.” – fantasyflightgames.com

D&D Magic Item Compendium

“The 3.5 Edition Premium Magic Item Compendium collects the most popular magic items in the D&D game and presents them in one easy-to-reference tome. This premium reprint also features an attractive new cover and includes errata.” – wizards.com

Jul 232011
 

If there is one irrefutable fact of gaming, one universal truth, one concept that can not be argued, one idea that can never be proven false, one thing that’s really, really true, it is the following:  dice are fun.

And so it goes that the wonderful game, We Didn’t Playtest This At All, of which we spoke last week, receives one more expansion pack, dubbed simply Dice Are Fun.  Packaged similarly to the Chaos Pack expansion, Dice Are Fun is able to be played along with the base game or as a stand-alone.  With the base game, players shuffle the deck and place the instruction card on top, along with a handful of dice.  Then, as players wish, they can draw a die and a card by discarding four cards from their hand or two starred cards.  As a stand-alone, players each need a D20 and something to keep score with as they will be working through the cards, one by one, slowly gaining or losing points on their D20, hoping to eventually stand at 40.  As with the other versions of this game, it plays fast, light, and funny.

It is a small world after all.  Why?  Because Philippe Keyaerts is not only the creator of the popular Small World, but also the new Olympos.  Structured around a theme of ancient Greece, Olympos is a multi-faceted strategy board game that sounds a barrows elements of Small World and 7 Wonders.  Basically, two boards are laid out, one that displays a map of ancient Greece and Atlantis, while the second displays pictures that represent “developments”.  The amount of actions players have is based off of where they are on the game’s timeline, but, regardless, the two types of actions are to expand settlers on the map game board or to purchase or build discoveries on the developments game board.  So, like 7 Wonders, there are numerous ways to acquire points and, thus, the victory.  Expect a well-designed, strategic experience when you pick up Olympos.

Ask yourself one question:  can you trust me?  Hopefully so, or else why are you reading this, but in the game of Double Agent you should never believe that you can trust anyone.  A two player game in the relatively new Duo Collection from Matagot, Double Agent has opponents facing off by using six secret agents to steal important government documents.  The trick here is that each player uses the same six agents, so neither knows which ones work for them.  Deception abounds and trickery ensues over the course of a fast-paced twenty minute play time.

Turn any table into King Arthur’s legendary round table with Artus.  You could also use a saw, but that gets sawdust everywhere and you’ll probably cut a finger off or something.  Anyway, to the game.  Artus uses its theme to full effect by using Arthur’s round table as the center piece of the game.  Players set “knights”, “royalty”, and unaffiliated pieces in various numbered spaces around the table.  The pieces rotate around the table, trading off the king position based on points acquired throughout the game.  Just remember your table manners.

In the jungle, the mighty jungle, the lion fears the elephant.  Obviously, that’s not how the song goes, but in the two-player game of Jungle, that’s how it works.  Players use animal tokens to move across a compact game board utilizing each animal’s unique ability over the others.  For instance, all creatures fear the elephant, but the elephant will run screaming from the mouse.  As the game operates on simple mechanics, it can be picked up in a matter of minutes.  But it may take years to become a true king of the jungle.