Aug 222014
 

Avengers Undercover v.1 tpbAvengers Undercover v.1 tpb

-If you’ve been reading Avengers Arena in trade, then this volume continues the story.

-Local writer, Dennis Hopeless, has been crafting one of the most tense, character-driven Marvel books on the stands and this is it!

-After surviving in a fight-to-the-death scenario, a group of Marvel‘s youngest heroes are shaken and traumatized.  But they know one thing, they want deadly revenge on the man who made them hurt their friends.

-Blending drama and comedy, Hopeless finds a tone that lands somewhere between a John Hughes movie and Wanted.

Sundowners #1Sundowners #1

-Tim Seeley, writer of Hack/Slash, 30 Days of Night, and Grayson, brings a new take on the superhero to Dark Horse.

-Another series in Dark Horse recent deconstructionist kick that has included Buzzkill, Furious, and Bloodhound.

-Being a superhero doesn’t mean that you don’t have doubts and insecurities.  The Sundowners are a group of disillusioned heroes who attend self-help meetings each week, some because they may be imagining every villain they’ve ever fought.

-Jim Terr, previously of The Crow:  Skinning the Wolves, brings his minimalist, Francesco Francavilla-esque style to a darker toned series.

Bob's Burgers #1Bob’s Burgers #1

-Cheat on Jimmy Pesto’s and pick up a greasy, juice first issue of Bob’s Burgers, the comic!

-Though the dulcet tones of H. Jon Benjamin’s voice don’t accompany this series, you will hear them in your head as you read through the raunchy humor of the issue.

-Dynamite continues its trend of releasing property comics that sound and feel like the original source material.

-Each issue contains five, short regular features, including Tina’s Erotic Friend Fiction.  Oh, yeeeeeaaaaaaah.

Pop #1 Pop #1

-Receiving ample buzz as a series to watch for, Pop is an absurdest take on celebrity and media in a modern culture.

-A stylistic experience on par with other surreal series, like Zero and Translucid, Pop plays with the comic format for narrative purposes.

-The high concept of the series is that celebrities are literally grown from scratch to serve the public’s demands and fixations.

-What if, in this alternate future, one of these manufactured celebrities escaped?  What then?

Dec 082012
 

Only the good die young.

That’s the case with Dennis Hopeless’ Avengers Arena, anyway.  As one of the characters in the first issue points out, there’s been a recent popularity in the teenagers-forced-to-kill each other genre of late, but there’s never been any superhero books that have adapted the concept.  Until Avengers Arena #1.  Spinning out of Christos Gage’s Avengers Academy, Brian K. Vaughn’s Runaways, and the X-Men books, this Battle Royale of teen heroes is violent, emotional, and shocking.  Fans of LOST will love the series, as well, since each issue is structured around one or two characters, making the large cast accessible as well as heightening the tension of who will live and who will die.  And, trust me, there’s a lot of death going around here.

And if you are planning on grabbing a copy of Avengers Arena #1 and, Dennis’ other Marvel NOW! series, Cable & X-Force on Wednesday, he’ll be at the store from 12-8 signing copies of these books as well as any of his previous work!  We’ll also have copies of every variant cover for the book, so if you’re the collector type have Dennis sign one of those for piece of Marvel memorabilia.

One of the most popular cult series of all time, The Crow, receives a new chapter from its creator, James O’Barr, this Wednesday.  After having been away from the series for nearly twenty years, O’Barr returns as both writer and artist for the three-part Crow:  Skinning the Wolves miniseries.  O’Barr has been planning to write this story ever since he created The Crow, setting the character into one of the darkest situations in human history: the holocaust.  Seeking vengeance against his captors, one victim is brought back from the dead by The Crow‘s powers, setting him on a course of violence against the Nazi scum who are committing the atrocities around him.  Anyone who knows anything about The Crow knows that the series has had troubles with remaining in print since it first was released, so if you want a copy Wednesday, show up early.  You may not get the chance later.

If movies have taught me anything, it’s that small towns are invariably supernatural.  Revival has become one of Image Comics‘ most popular ongoing series since its release, being dubbed the new Walking Dead, in some cases.  Taking place in a tiny rural town, the story revolves around the town’s residents coming back from the dead.  Not, however, in a zombie-esque sort of way, though, but instead returning just as they left and having to reincorporate themselves into the population.  Obviously, there are some questions over how and why this is happening.  Tim Seeley, the creator of Hack/Slash, and Mike Norton, artist on Battlepug, are making Revival a must-read series each month, and this collection of the first six issues is exactly where you need to jump in.

What do a wealthy rapper, a thieving screenwriter, and a cosmonaut on his last legs have in common?  They star in Ales Kot’s new Image comic, Change.  Also, they are Los Angles’ only hope against evil forces who threaten the city in time periods throughout history.  His sophomore comic effort after the surreal experience that was the Wild Children one-shot from earlier this year, Ales Kot brings his unique voice to the sci-fi genre with the time-jumping madness that is Change #1.
Jul 072012
 

Darwyn Cooke is easily one of the most talented creators working in comics today, as you’ll know if you’ve read the first issue of Minutemen (number two comes out Wednesday, by the way). Over the last three years, Cooke has been chipping away at a passion project he’s born to write and draw, that being the crime novels of Richard Stark. Set in the 50′s, these novels, both graphic and prose, were the Thief of Thieves way before Thief of Thieves as well as Mad Men before it became popular. Both style and grit mixed together, The Score is the most recent novel Cooke is adapting for the comic medium. In this story, Parker, a veteran thief, pulls together a band of con men and criminals to pull the job of a lifetime: rob an entire town. Cooke loves these stories and puts as much craft and effort into retelling them as Stark did creating them.

Ranking up there with Johnny the Homicidal Maniac, The Crow gets asked about more than any other book that is currently (and consistently) not in print. But for those who’ve been gasping for a Crow fix, IDW has a new comic series coming out this Wednesday. Following a young Japanese student who is possessed by the vengeance seeking spirit, this new series is written by one of the screenwriters of the cult classic Crow film.

Maybe you partake in some recreational, um, substances from time to time. Maybe you fight the man with your daily lifestyle. Maybe you hate the way your parents treat you. Whatever rebellious spirit burns inside you, the Wild Children one shot from Image Comics will feed the flame. Written by new comer Ales Kot and drawn by the ever present Riley Rossmo (Rebel Blood, Green Wake, Cowboy Ninja Viking), this extra hefty issue is the one to add to your pile this week. Here’s a review from comic review website Talking Comics to entice you further. When a comic earns a quote from legendary hermit Alan Moore, you know it’s good.

Not the zombie story your used to, Revival, from Image Comics, is sure to be the new sensation this week (if people can find it in the sea of Walking Dead #100 variants). Written by Tim Seeley (of cult favorite horror book Hack/Slash) and drawn by Mike Norton (of Battlepug, which is at the store this very moment), Revival is set in a rural community who find their dead rising from the ground, not as mindless cannibals but as they were before they passed. When a murder occurs, both living and dead become suspects. This series has been hyped as a possible “next Walking Dead” so be sure to nab a copy.