Jan 172014
 

Got eight minutes to spare?

Why not play Eight-Minute Empire: Legends?  The second stand-alone release in this line, Legends is literally playable in eight minutes, ready-made for quick gaming in between gaming.  The game involves players picking cards off of six piles, with each card providing a special action to perform immediately after.

Three new ships pull into the Star Trek Attack Wing docking bay this weekend, including the USS Excelsior for the Federation, RIS Vo from the Romulan alliance, and Dominion’s Koranak vessel.

Who you gonna call?  Yourself!

Ghooost! is family friendly, easily travel-able card matching game where players try to get rid of their hand of cards by matching suits with cards previously laid down.  Players pull from their “mansion” for new cards, hoping for cards with special abilities that allow them to lay more cards or enact other actions.  The whole game also comes in a handy carrying box that folds out into the game board.

Gamer couples searching for a new two player experience need look no further than Pixel Tactics and Pixel Tactics 2.

Head-to-head battling is the name of the game, stemming from each player controlling an identical deck of cards, but assigning a specific leader card to the deck that entirely alters how each card plays.  This allows for twenty-five different variations on the standard deck.  And don’t worry about picking these initially releases up in order, they are both stand-alone and can be played in any order.

The fifth large expansion for the Warhammer:  Invasion LCG card game, Hidden Kingdoms, fleshes out the remaining factions that have, up until now, not seen play in the game.  These include Skaven, Lizardmen, Wood Elves, and Undead, each of which has been built-up to a full faction.

The Mayan apocalypse may never have come, but that hasn’t stopped Tzolk’in from producing an expansion to end all expansions.  Tribes and Prophecies not only adds enough pieces to include a fifth player, but also alters the gaming experience entirely by allowing each player to take command of tribe leaders that grant them abilities beyond the normal selection.

Space is a vast and endless place, which means Rio Grand Games has plenty of universe to produce a fifth Race for the Galaxy expansion from.  Alien Artifacts adds a fifth playable deck onto the base game, as well as five additional start worlds.  Along with these extra pieces, the expansion contains another gaming mode where players map an alien “orb” searching for artifacts that gain them extra powers.

For the penultimate game item, Pathfinder, like a Pokemon trainer on a winning spree, continues to evolve their dragons.  This time around, it’s the Red Dragon Evolution set of miniatures.

And, basically, that’s kinda it…

Like there’s three dragons.

And some are bigger than others.

But they’re all red…

Yup…

Anyway, the ‘verse is never done offering up rewards for determined, swindly captains, especially ones experienced in Breakin’ Atmo.

The first expansion deck for the beloved Firefly board game, Breakin’ Atmo, supplies players with twenty-five new jobs, supply cards, and shiploads of gear!  Shiny don’t even begin to describe this valuable bobble!

Mar 172012
 

New comic March continues this week with another onslaught of inventive Indy fair. Here’s the rundown:

-Dominique Laveau Voodoo Child: New Orleans, voodoo, and ghosts come together for this new Vertigo ongoing. Dominique, a young grad student, finds that she’s wanted by the magic community of New Orleans…for murdering their Voodoo Queen.

-Hoax Hunters: A take off of popular Ghost Hunting shows, this miniseries revolves around a team of reality TV personalities who hunt and explain mysterious creatures around the globe. Issue #0 focuses on a long lost Russian astronaut ghost. Creeeeepy.

-Ragemoor: In line with classic Gothic tales from Poe and Lovecraft, this new horror miniseries from legendary Heavy Metal artist Richard Corben focuses on a living mansion with an insane owner and an unholy secret.

-Rebel Blood: Riley Rossmo, artist of Cowboy, Ninja, Viking, lends his writing and illustrative talents to this Image Comics horror series where demonic, zombie creatures, both human and animal, are roaming the Southern landscape, chewing on the living.

-Rocketeer Adventures 2: Following in the same style as the first series, each issue of this miniseries contains short Rocketeer stories from the industry’s best writers and artists. With guys like Darwyn Cooke, Peter David, Art Adams, and Bill Sienkiewicz, creating new pulpy stories how can you go wrong?

-Smoke & Mirrors: Akin to the recent IDW series Memorial, this fantasy miniseries incorporates actual slight of hand and stage magic tricks into its tale of a lost soul in a world where magic has advanced past technology.

-Supercrooks: Mark Millar, the sensational author behind Kick-Ass, Nemesis, and The Ultimates, offers this new take on the supervillain. When a villain team from America feels the heat, they relocate to Spain for a little overseas badness.

Oh my Thanos! So, many comics!

And how ’bout some more?

Nick Spencer is a man of many talents. He can write zany, wordy alternate world hopping tales like Infinite Vacation while also being able to manage subtle, minimal spy books like Thunder Agents. And he can write political cape and cowl fair like a mofo! The new collection of Ultimate Comics X-Men will prove this to you. If you haven’t kept up with the Ultimate universe, one, this is a good book to get in on and, two, how about a little backstory? The X-Men are in tatters after most of the team has died (that’s Xavier, Wolverine, Cyclops, and others, folks) and the government is out for mutant blood. That leaves the ragtag team of Kitty Pryde, Wolverine’s son, Johnny Storm, Iceman, and Rogue to face off against William Stryker, the country’s most recent religious zealot who’s murdering mutants indiscriminately. Unlike any other X-Men book you’ve ever read.

Finally, let’s end the night with one of Vincent Van Gogh’s classic paintings: TARDIS Mid-Explosion. And if that doesn’t suit your refined tastes, maybe a Weeping Angel t-shirt will.

Oct 142011
 

So, here it is Friday again and time for another New Game Stuff post.

Whoa, what?

Fridays are Comic List Highlights, not New Game Stuff!  What’s happening!  My world’s crumbling!  My brain is melting!  Fire is raining from the skies!  MAKE IT STOP!  MAKE IT STOP!

Whew, okay, ready to go.  Yes, you can now expect Fridays to be home to the New Game Stuff posts while Saturdays will become Comic List Highlights.

And for the inaugural gaming item, a new supply to one of our favorite deck building games, Resident Evil.  If you haven’t played it, the Resident Evil Deck Building Game is akin to Dominion and Ascension, featuring a play style centered around selective purchasing and playing of cards.  Anyway, the official playmats for the game are now in stock.  That’s playmats with original game art on them as well as designated spaces for key cards in the game, like the mansion, ammunition cards, combat knife, and handgun.

Oh, ‘ello, chappy.  Are you a discerning Arkham Horror player?  Ah, yes, I can see that.  Well, then you surely have a collection of Litko Game Accessories Arkham Horror compatible accoutrements?  Oh, you don’t!  I wouldn’t spread that around town, if I were you.  It’s okay, though, because we can provide assistance.  In that I mean, Pulp only today received a vast assortment of various markers, tokens, and bases to accompany the game.  These include Iron Gate Markers (able to display in-game iron gate tokens), tentacled Monster Bases (also helpful to display monster tokens), as well as larger, transparent blue Sealed Gate Tokens (improve the small sealed gate tokens that come with the game), among other niceties.  Improve your horror experience, gents and ladies, improve it.

Are you ready for a Blood Bowl!  A Friday night Blood Bowl!  

Ehhhh, too soon?  You don’t have to be Bocephus (actually, you’d probably prefer not to be) to enjoy a the new card game from the makers of Blood Bowl, Team Manger.  Basically the original game in card form, Team Manager runs two to four players through a season of the hard hittingest, blood spillingest, bone crunchingest game ever, as they battle over players, train their team, and via for fans on top of playing each other.  If it hasn’t occurred to you, the fitting pun here is fantasy football as your player options are dwarfs, elves, orcs, and the like.  Lets just say, Hank Williams, Jr.’s recent comments may actually be appreciated in this game.

Summoner Wars enacts their master plan this week by dropping not only a Master Set edition, but two new Reinforcement Decks, Goodwin’s Blade and Hawk’s Strike.  Unlike in the game, you don’t have to use mystical forces to call forth these packs of warrior-y might.  But if you do use the magic of your wallet, you might find some dangerous allies at your finger tips.  For instance, the Hawk’s Strike pack expands upon the Jungle Elves and Cloaks factions while Goodwin’s Blade expands Vanguards and Fallen Kingdoms.  But maybe the most valued of these three is the new Master Set.  Unlike what you might think when you hear that phrase, the Master Set provides six entirely new faction decks!  Not only is this enough to start a prospective player off on the game, but a premium game board is also included, giving players a perfect setting to play their game.

Oct 012011
 

Show of hands, who wants to be a zombie?  Okay, there’s one…uh, two…all right, just two.  What if I stipulated that you’re not becoming a zombie in real life, just a card game?  And there go the hands.

Yes, the Resident Evil Deck Building Game now comes with more zombifying power thanks to the new Outbreak expansion.  Unlike the last expansion, Alliance, Outbreak follows in Dominion‘s footsteps again by making this expansion a traditional one, i.e. you will need one of the base sets to use it.  As usual, this edition includes a cadre of new zombie fighters, including Kevin Ryman and Mark Wilkins, as well as new weapons, like the stun rod and samurai edge.  Primarily, though, what Outbreak adds is a new Infection play mode.  Basic rules apply, but above the mansion deck sits an infection deck that everyone plays out of in an effort to control their infection level.  If any player rises to 10 infection cards, they become an undead zombie and can attack other players.

How many hands now?

With deck building fresh in the brain pan, how about we look at a the release of the revised version of Arcana.  From Fantasy Flight, Arcana is a card based game where players manage and utilize guilds of thieves to gain control of the city of Cadwallon.  If you’ve played City of Thieves, this might sound like a similar premise and that’s because the two games are similar in many characters and options, but different in mechanics.  One thing that is different here is that the playable guilds are trying to rest power from the citizens of Cadwallon, not treasure.  Everyone vies for stake cards by scraping up and using, resourcefully, location cards, relic cards, and others.  If you’ve played the original version of the game and are curious what this one adds and updates, basically, the cards and materials are all redesigned along with a ton of rules alterations and added play modes.

Never before have I thought that I would receive the opportunity to type in vampire pirate speak.  Thankfully, Games Workshop has given me the chance with its publication of Dreadfleet.  Arrhhggg, matey, I want to suck ye blood.  That just feels right, doesn’t it?  The reason that I’m able to enact one of my dreams by typing that is because Dreadfleet is all about vampire pirates.  Two players command opposing fleets of ships facing off over a five foot by three and a half foot board, strategically maneuvering their vessels against each other.  Each ship has a coordinating card with all its stats and as well as an extremely detailed model to go along with it.  The game also comes with a number of obstacles models to place on the board.  If Dreadfleet turns out anything like the last stand-alone boardgame Games Workshop released, Space Hulk, it will disappear from shelves overnight and increase in value at the drop of a hat.

Can you guess this game’s title with this one clue:  the state I, generally, live my life in?  If you guessed Confusion, you would be correct.  Actually, the real title is Confusion: Espionage and Deception in the Cold War, but, come on, who would ever guess that?  Unlike your common Cold War game (is there really such a thing?) Confusion begins with both players having no idea how their pieces move.  Over the course of the game, through trial and error, they attempt to learn each piece’s abilities.  Concurrently, they are also attempting to acquire a special token in the center of the board and escape with it across your opponent’s border.  A classic game reprinted, Confusion is a blend of chess, Clue, and Code 777.

Last time I checked, this is America.  And in America we like our bowls super, our macs big, and our dice jumbo.  To that effect, Steve Jackson has released a line of Jumbo D6s for Munchkin.  Coming in a variety of colors (orange, red, green, blue, yellow, and purple), each package includes a Munchkin D6 and a Monster D6, both with different artwork next to each number.  America also likes to get stuff for buying other stuff.  That is why all of these dice come with two unique treasure cards, one for Munchkin and one for Munchkin Quest.  Now that’s ‘Merica for you!    

This town ain’t big enough for the both of us, pardner.  That one sentence perfectly describes the game Deadwood.  Welp, guess that does it for me, folks.  Okay, a little bit more.  Deadwood embodies that age-old adage by having players compete over various buildings that comprise the titled town.  Each player receives a group of three types of cowboys to do this with, each with their own powers.  Along with that, each building enacts certain game changing abilities, some times when they are initially played and, other times, after they have sat on the board awhile.  Get your Al Swearengen on and pick up Deadwood.

Let’s lower the temperature a bit so that Ice Dice from Looney Labs feels comfortable.  But wait, simply by bringing it into the conversation brings up the temperature in the room.  That’s ’cause it’s sexy.  The reason for that bold statement is that this is an easily portable, easily learned, easily played game using the same translucent pyramid pieces that Looney Labs used for Treetop.  Gamers roll a die to see which size and color pyramid they nab from the center bank in an effort to score three matching sets.  If that exact pyramid is gone, steal it from an opponent.  More sexiness?  How about the ability to play another, completely different game called Launchpad 23?  Did it!

Apr 232011
 

Whoa-o-o, it’s Magic, you kno-o-o-ow.  Never believe it’s not sooooooo!

Be happy you can’t actually hear me sing that.  Not good.

Anyway, it is MagicMagic the Gathering to be specific.  And to be even more specific, it’s a bunch of Magic rares.  Never done this on here before, but as Pulp just picked up a couple of important, sought after rares, figured it might be worth a try to post them up on here.

First off, we currently have three Tezzerets in stock.  That’s three Tezzeret, Agent of Bolas cards.  Also, we’ve got a Mox Opal, Sword of Feast and Famine, Vengevine, Hero of Bladehold, Arid Mesa, Thrun the Last Troll, and Marsh Flats.  If you’ve been needing any of these cards to flesh out a deck, come get to’em before they’re gone.

The Resident Evil Deck Building Game dropped its eagerly awaited second set this week, dubbed Alliance.  Why do I say second set and not expansion?  Because, though this set can be played in conjunction with the original (expanding it to allow for 8 players), it is also a standalone game.  Think Dominion:  Intrigue.  In fact, just think Dominion, because if you’ve played that game, you’re going to be able to understand Resident Evil in a flash.  What it adds to the dynamic is a monster fighting element where players “explore the mansion” to battle zombified baddies and the ability to control a character card (Chris Redfield, Jill Valentine, the whole bunch).  Alliance also adds a new “Partner” play system that gives gamers the ability to team-up with others as they fight monsters.  As one would expect, a bunch of new characters, creatures, and weapons are also included.

YOU SHALL NOT PASS…actually, we’d be completely alright if you wanted to pass, like, that’d be fine.  Totally.  If my awkward fumbling hasn’t clued you in, Fantasy Flight‘s new Lord of the Rings Card Game has appeared on sleeves.  A co-op or single player game, LotRCG has players teaming up to complete various scenarios packaged in the game.  This game is in a line of living card games, such as Call of Cthulhu and Warhammer Invasion, which means new expansion decks, with new characters, scenarios, and creatures, will come out on a fairly regular basis.  And, if I might say, the card art is quite fetching.

Finally, an important restock item.  Mouse Guard the RPG is back in stock.  If anyone has been waiting with baited breath for this gorgeous hardcover to come back in print, they are allowed to breath again.  Based on the popular Mouse Guard comic series, Luke Crane has transferred the rich world of the comic into an elegant roleplaying game.  Featuring artwork from David Petersen, the creator of Mouse Guard himself, this book contains all a game master or player will need to know in order to build a world and begin exploring.  The presentation of the book couldn’t be better; the dimensions match those of the comic hardcovers, so this book can sit next to them on your shelf with no shame whatsoever.