Jul 072012
 

Darwyn Cooke is easily one of the most talented creators working in comics today, as you’ll know if you’ve read the first issue of Minutemen (number two comes out Wednesday, by the way). Over the last three years, Cooke has been chipping away at a passion project he’s born to write and draw, that being the crime novels of Richard Stark. Set in the 50′s, these novels, both graphic and prose, were the Thief of Thieves way before Thief of Thieves as well as Mad Men before it became popular. Both style and grit mixed together, The Score is the most recent novel Cooke is adapting for the comic medium. In this story, Parker, a veteran thief, pulls together a band of con men and criminals to pull the job of a lifetime: rob an entire town. Cooke loves these stories and puts as much craft and effort into retelling them as Stark did creating them.

Ranking up there with Johnny the Homicidal Maniac, The Crow gets asked about more than any other book that is currently (and consistently) not in print. But for those who’ve been gasping for a Crow fix, IDW has a new comic series coming out this Wednesday. Following a young Japanese student who is possessed by the vengeance seeking spirit, this new series is written by one of the screenwriters of the cult classic Crow film.

Maybe you partake in some recreational, um, substances from time to time. Maybe you fight the man with your daily lifestyle. Maybe you hate the way your parents treat you. Whatever rebellious spirit burns inside you, the Wild Children one shot from Image Comics will feed the flame. Written by new comer Ales Kot and drawn by the ever present Riley Rossmo (Rebel Blood, Green Wake, Cowboy Ninja Viking), this extra hefty issue is the one to add to your pile this week. Here’s a review from comic review website Talking Comics to entice you further. When a comic earns a quote from legendary hermit Alan Moore, you know it’s good.

Not the zombie story your used to, Revival, from Image Comics, is sure to be the new sensation this week (if people can find it in the sea of Walking Dead #100 variants). Written by Tim Seeley (of cult favorite horror book Hack/Slash) and drawn by Mike Norton (of Battlepug, which is at the store this very moment), Revival is set in a rural community who find their dead rising from the ground, not as mindless cannibals but as they were before they passed. When a murder occurs, both living and dead become suspects. This series has been hyped as a possible “next Walking Dead” so be sure to nab a copy.

May 132011
 

Welcome to Pulp’s plush corner.

Doesn’t that just sound wrong, in some way?  Whether it does or not, it’s still true.

Marvel unleashes their secret box of cute with four new superhero plush figures.  Can you guess what four heroes they’ve chosen?  Seriously, shout at the computer.

That’s just silly, don’t do that.  Okay, it’s Spider-Man, Iron Man, Hulk, and Thor.  Hmm, coincidence that they all have movies coming out soon?  Not as coincidental, they are all super cuddly.

And if you’re sitting there, thinking to yourself, “Man, I wish my plush Marvel figures had some bad guy to fight”.  Well, think no more!  Actually, that’s probably not a good idea, keep thinking.  In fact, start thinking about this new uber darling, My First Cthulhu.  Look how pudgy his belly is!  An elder god has never looked so huggable.

Do you like zombies?  Do you like cowboys?  Do you like zombie cowboys?  Of course you do.  This week welcomes Zeke Deadwood, Zombie Lawman to the shelves; the primary zombie cowboy.  What do creators Thomas Boatwright and Ryan Rubio do with how undead hero?  It’s the classic western tale:  bad hombres are roughing up a town until Zeke rides into town, ready to lay down the law.  This one shot looks like it could have a twisted, humorous sensibility like Rango or Johnny the Homicidal Maniac.

Okay, pay attention, ’cause this is important.  An omnibus version of Geoff Johns a chunk of his run on The Flash his arriving this week and you all need to buy it.  Why?  Because you might be out there doubting that the Flash can be an interesting character and this collection of Johns’ first twelve issues, the one-shots Iron Heights and Our Worlds at War, as well as Secret Files #3.  In these issues (and the ones that follow) Johns was able to infuse Wally West, the then Flash, with a well-rounded emotional core.  In short, he made you care about him.  He always went a step further and fleshed out the backstories on all of the Flash‘s rogues, making each of them way more compelling than they had ever been before.  And when you’ve got guys like Captain Cold and Weather Wizard, that can be a steep mountain to climb.  Fluid, detailed art by the likes of Scott Kolins and Ethan Van Sciver adds to the total package here.  Seriously, this is good comics.  Check it out.

If you think fezs, bowties, and stetsons are cool, then here’s something else you’re going to think is cool:  the 11th Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver.  Want to know why you’ll think it’s cool?  Not only is this an exact, collectible replica of the Doctor’s famous deus ex machina tool (complete with green lights and “vir” sound effects), but it’s actually a screwdriver.  Yes, it comes with three tips for various size screws that can be fitted to the bottom of the screwdriver.  Usually, it’d be cool enough just to whip the thing around pretending to open doors and whatnot, but now you can actually screw something together!