Jun 082012
 

We’ve practically had to fight off the descending hoards of rabid Quarriors fans this week in anticipation the new expansion.

Well, we’re still alive and Quarmageddon is here. This new add-on expansion for the base game offers not only 40 original dice which power 6 new creatures, a new immunity ability, and 2 new spells, but an entirely new set of rules to be applied to the game. And if Quarriors is an insane made up word to you, because, one, it is, and, two, you’ve never played the game, it’s deck building with dice combined with a fair amount of snark.

Bandai takes the skills it acquired developing their hit Resident Evil Deck Building Game and apply them to another popular gaming franchise, Uncharted. In the Uncharted card/board game players take on the role of characters from throughout the three existing Uncharted games. While collecting and battling against various action, treasure, and enemy cards, players acquire victory points, eventually leading to a winner. Borrowing elements from the Resident Evil games, Uncharted spins them in a fresh way, recreating the feel of the video games.

It’s that time again, the time when Dungeons & Dragons adds a new edition to their vast mansion of tiled dungeons. This time around Wizards presents them in a stunning Urban Underdark hue, coming with six sheets of flooring material for to add a layer of cozy, dank creepiness to your next campaign.

What game through yonder RPG breaks? Or something like that.

The works of The Bard (that’s Shakespeare to you uncouth individuals) have been applied to a witty, brilliant new Indy storytelling game called The Play’s the Thing. Similar to Do: Pilgrims of the Flying Temple and Fiasco, The Play’s the Thing revolves around a playwright/actor structure where one gamer takes on the role of the playwright, assigning roles and constructing the story. Each actor (Hams, Leads, Villains, and Ingenues) suggest and act out alterations to the story as they play through, often altering classic tales for the wackier.

Queen Games keeps their streak of inventive strategy games going with Edo. Set in the Japan landscape of 1603 to 1868. Each player takes on the role of a Daimyo, building houses and castles, trading goods, and increasing their reputation to the Shogun. Beautifully laid out and designed, Edo should find a good home next to your copies of Samarkand and Fresco.

Bad guys have all the fun. Luckily, you can get in on all the Hobbit murdering shenanigans of Sauron’s Nazgul in the new Lord of the Rings: Nazgul Heroclix game. Taking on the role of the hooded riders, players build allegiances, strategize, and, ultimately, keep the One Ring from falling into the pits of Mount Doom. And, if you own the previously released LotR Heroclix, you can incorporate them into the game.

Aug 202011
 

Once upon a time there was a magical land known as Gen Con.  Inside its hallowed, carpeted halls were number upon number of games, both brilliant and beguiling.  It took two valiant, but nerdy kings to whisk away every last one of these playful treasures and deliver them back to their home kingdom of Pulpious Fictione.  It is now that we bring these gaming devices to you, kind folks.

In line with all this fairy tale speak is the impressively organized and designed new game called Chaostle.  Joining the family of dungeon crawl boardgames like Tailsman, Wrath of Ashardalon, and Descent, Chaostle is set-up like a classic Dungeons & Dragons adventure.  Everyone’s character (there’s, like, over 20 to choose from) attempts to fight their way around the dungeon/castle game board, battling off monsters, snake pits, and other nasty die-roll-induced evils.  For a game released by a smaller independent company, the level of detail and craftsmanship put into this game is astonishing.  Thick cardboard character cards, detailed miniatures, a numbered game board/piece layout that makes it easy to assemble the game, and many other nifty features make this a guaranteed bang for buck purchase.

Go, ninja!  Go, ninja!  Go!  At least a couple of people will be screaming this ancient, icy chant when playing Ninja:  Legend of the Scorpion Clan.  The rest of the players will be attempting to suppress the efforts of the black clad ninja as castle guards.  But beware, there is a traitor in their midst who will aid the ninjas at the most crucial moment.  Half boardgame, half card game, this Legend of the Five Rings spin-off plays as a tense game of cat and mouse as ninja players try to avoid any sound or action that will give them away, while guards work to track them down.  Both sides have their own special abilities (like poison sake, creaking boards, and climbing ropes) to aid them in their efforts.  If you enjoy Last Night on Earth or City of Thieves, this is an up-your-alley type of game.

In the new printing of Savage Worlds Deluxe, the titled worlds run the gamut from western bordello to deep space minefield to Amazonian jungles.  Any setting you can think of is playable in Savage Worlds.  More than that, this new deluxe edition contains all the information on rules, character creation, weapons, and game mastering you’ll ever need.  If you’re a young, inexperienced roleplayer, this would be a solid game to start out with as far as being able to play in whatever setting you desire.

Taking it to the streets this week, the new Street Fighter Heroclix.  Sold in a similar drop box to the Smurfs figures, these boosters come one figure to a box.  There are 23 figures to collect overall, some of which are super rares that are already jumping up in price.  The best thing, these little dudes are only $3 a pop!  And collecting isn’t the only thing you can do with them as they are completely usable, playable Heroclix figures.  So, fight’em alone or against any other Heroclix figure!

Dear Pilgrims of the Flying Temple,

Don’t call it a roleplaying game because Do, Pilgrims of the Flying Temple is a beautifully illustrated, endlessly repeatable multi-player storytelling game set in a world of high-flying adventure.  The three to five people playing will assume the role of a pilgrim of the flying temple, who begin their journey with a letter of distress from a neighboring planet.  It is this impetus that leads gamers into the story they will continue on their own.  The artwork in this book is seriously beyond gorgeous; very Disney-esque.  Also, for those lovers of Avatar, the Last Airbender out there (so, basically everyone ever) Do is about as close as you will ever get to owning a RPG version of that show.

Sincerely,

Jayson Quearry, Pulp Fiction Register Monkey