Oct 012011
 

Show of hands, who wants to be a zombie?  Okay, there’s one…uh, two…all right, just two.  What if I stipulated that you’re not becoming a zombie in real life, just a card game?  And there go the hands.

Yes, the Resident Evil Deck Building Game now comes with more zombifying power thanks to the new Outbreak expansion.  Unlike the last expansion, Alliance, Outbreak follows in Dominion‘s footsteps again by making this expansion a traditional one, i.e. you will need one of the base sets to use it.  As usual, this edition includes a cadre of new zombie fighters, including Kevin Ryman and Mark Wilkins, as well as new weapons, like the stun rod and samurai edge.  Primarily, though, what Outbreak adds is a new Infection play mode.  Basic rules apply, but above the mansion deck sits an infection deck that everyone plays out of in an effort to control their infection level.  If any player rises to 10 infection cards, they become an undead zombie and can attack other players.

How many hands now?

With deck building fresh in the brain pan, how about we look at a the release of the revised version of Arcana.  From Fantasy Flight, Arcana is a card based game where players manage and utilize guilds of thieves to gain control of the city of Cadwallon.  If you’ve played City of Thieves, this might sound like a similar premise and that’s because the two games are similar in many characters and options, but different in mechanics.  One thing that is different here is that the playable guilds are trying to rest power from the citizens of Cadwallon, not treasure.  Everyone vies for stake cards by scraping up and using, resourcefully, location cards, relic cards, and others.  If you’ve played the original version of the game and are curious what this one adds and updates, basically, the cards and materials are all redesigned along with a ton of rules alterations and added play modes.

Never before have I thought that I would receive the opportunity to type in vampire pirate speak.  Thankfully, Games Workshop has given me the chance with its publication of Dreadfleet.  Arrhhggg, matey, I want to suck ye blood.  That just feels right, doesn’t it?  The reason that I’m able to enact one of my dreams by typing that is because Dreadfleet is all about vampire pirates.  Two players command opposing fleets of ships facing off over a five foot by three and a half foot board, strategically maneuvering their vessels against each other.  Each ship has a coordinating card with all its stats and as well as an extremely detailed model to go along with it.  The game also comes with a number of obstacles models to place on the board.  If Dreadfleet turns out anything like the last stand-alone boardgame Games Workshop released, Space Hulk, it will disappear from shelves overnight and increase in value at the drop of a hat.

Can you guess this game’s title with this one clue:  the state I, generally, live my life in?  If you guessed Confusion, you would be correct.  Actually, the real title is Confusion: Espionage and Deception in the Cold War, but, come on, who would ever guess that?  Unlike your common Cold War game (is there really such a thing?) Confusion begins with both players having no idea how their pieces move.  Over the course of the game, through trial and error, they attempt to learn each piece’s abilities.  Concurrently, they are also attempting to acquire a special token in the center of the board and escape with it across your opponent’s border.  A classic game reprinted, Confusion is a blend of chess, Clue, and Code 777.

Last time I checked, this is America.  And in America we like our bowls super, our macs big, and our dice jumbo.  To that effect, Steve Jackson has released a line of Jumbo D6s for Munchkin.  Coming in a variety of colors (orange, red, green, blue, yellow, and purple), each package includes a Munchkin D6 and a Monster D6, both with different artwork next to each number.  America also likes to get stuff for buying other stuff.  That is why all of these dice come with two unique treasure cards, one for Munchkin and one for Munchkin Quest.  Now that’s ‘Merica for you!    

This town ain’t big enough for the both of us, pardner.  That one sentence perfectly describes the game Deadwood.  Welp, guess that does it for me, folks.  Okay, a little bit more.  Deadwood embodies that age-old adage by having players compete over various buildings that comprise the titled town.  Each player receives a group of three types of cowboys to do this with, each with their own powers.  Along with that, each building enacts certain game changing abilities, some times when they are initially played and, other times, after they have sat on the board awhile.  Get your Al Swearengen on and pick up Deadwood.

Let’s lower the temperature a bit so that Ice Dice from Looney Labs feels comfortable.  But wait, simply by bringing it into the conversation brings up the temperature in the room.  That’s ’cause it’s sexy.  The reason for that bold statement is that this is an easily portable, easily learned, easily played game using the same translucent pyramid pieces that Looney Labs used for Treetop.  Gamers roll a die to see which size and color pyramid they nab from the center bank in an effort to score three matching sets.  If that exact pyramid is gone, steal it from an opponent.  More sexiness?  How about the ability to play another, completely different game called Launchpad 23?  Did it!

Aug 202011
 

Once upon a time there was a magical land known as Gen Con.  Inside its hallowed, carpeted halls were number upon number of games, both brilliant and beguiling.  It took two valiant, but nerdy kings to whisk away every last one of these playful treasures and deliver them back to their home kingdom of Pulpious Fictione.  It is now that we bring these gaming devices to you, kind folks.

In line with all this fairy tale speak is the impressively organized and designed new game called Chaostle.  Joining the family of dungeon crawl boardgames like Tailsman, Wrath of Ashardalon, and Descent, Chaostle is set-up like a classic Dungeons & Dragons adventure.  Everyone’s character (there’s, like, over 20 to choose from) attempts to fight their way around the dungeon/castle game board, battling off monsters, snake pits, and other nasty die-roll-induced evils.  For a game released by a smaller independent company, the level of detail and craftsmanship put into this game is astonishing.  Thick cardboard character cards, detailed miniatures, a numbered game board/piece layout that makes it easy to assemble the game, and many other nifty features make this a guaranteed bang for buck purchase.

Go, ninja!  Go, ninja!  Go!  At least a couple of people will be screaming this ancient, icy chant when playing Ninja:  Legend of the Scorpion Clan.  The rest of the players will be attempting to suppress the efforts of the black clad ninja as castle guards.  But beware, there is a traitor in their midst who will aid the ninjas at the most crucial moment.  Half boardgame, half card game, this Legend of the Five Rings spin-off plays as a tense game of cat and mouse as ninja players try to avoid any sound or action that will give them away, while guards work to track them down.  Both sides have their own special abilities (like poison sake, creaking boards, and climbing ropes) to aid them in their efforts.  If you enjoy Last Night on Earth or City of Thieves, this is an up-your-alley type of game.

In the new printing of Savage Worlds Deluxe, the titled worlds run the gamut from western bordello to deep space minefield to Amazonian jungles.  Any setting you can think of is playable in Savage Worlds.  More than that, this new deluxe edition contains all the information on rules, character creation, weapons, and game mastering you’ll ever need.  If you’re a young, inexperienced roleplayer, this would be a solid game to start out with as far as being able to play in whatever setting you desire.

Taking it to the streets this week, the new Street Fighter Heroclix.  Sold in a similar drop box to the Smurfs figures, these boosters come one figure to a box.  There are 23 figures to collect overall, some of which are super rares that are already jumping up in price.  The best thing, these little dudes are only $3 a pop!  And collecting isn’t the only thing you can do with them as they are completely usable, playable Heroclix figures.  So, fight’em alone or against any other Heroclix figure!

Dear Pilgrims of the Flying Temple,

Don’t call it a roleplaying game because Do, Pilgrims of the Flying Temple is a beautifully illustrated, endlessly repeatable multi-player storytelling game set in a world of high-flying adventure.  The three to five people playing will assume the role of a pilgrim of the flying temple, who begin their journey with a letter of distress from a neighboring planet.  It is this impetus that leads gamers into the story they will continue on their own.  The artwork in this book is seriously beyond gorgeous; very Disney-esque.  Also, for those lovers of Avatar, the Last Airbender out there (so, basically everyone ever) Do is about as close as you will ever get to owning a RPG version of that show.

Sincerely,

Jayson Quearry, Pulp Fiction Register Monkey

Jun 082011
 

So, here we are on Friday, with our normal…wait, what’s that?  It’s Wednesday?  Huh.

Well, uh, welcome to our Wednesday New Game Stuff post!

The first couple of items we’re going to start out with, it should be noted, won’t actually be available for purchase until Friday.  So, don’t get too jumpy, just yet.

First up, is all the new D&D items that are hitting this Friday.  The new Witchlight Fens Dungeon Tiles are another in the long line of D&D tile sets.  Specifically, Witchlight adds onto The Wilderness pack, focusing on swamps.  Also shipping is, The Monster Vault:  Threats of Nentir Vale hardcover which includes within its glossy pages a number of creatures from the titled region.  Creatures like the Raven Roost Bandits, stand as perfect challenges for heroic and paragon-tier characters.  The book also includes the standard pages of monster tokens and maps that you expect.

Also dropping Friday are the New Phyrexia Event Decks.  If you remember the Mirrodin Besieged Event Decks, these are extremely strong, vastly playable decks constructed to dominate your opponents.  Most of the people I’ve seen play with these have come in somewhere in the top five players of the night.  These two New Phyrexia decks, War of Attrition and Rot from Within, are built around white and green, respectively.  Even if you don’t want to use the decks, some of the cards they contain are worth it alone.  For instance, War has two Stoneforge Mystics, one Mirran Crusader, and a Puresteel Paladin while Rot has an Inkmoth Nexus, a Green Sun’s Zenith, and a Putrefax.  These are also limited; once we’re out, we’re out.  So, get’em while you can.

Okay, now for some stuff that you can actually buy today!

If you weren’t aware, this year marks the 10th anniversary of one of our favorite games, Carcassonne.  We like to call it a “tent-pole” game, as it is one of our consistent sellers and an all around enjoyable game for the whole family.  As part of the anniversary celebration, Rio Grande Games has released a new Carcassonne 10th Anniversary edition, which contains ten new tiles for the Festival expansion as well as the new, clear, “phantom” meeples.  Speaking of meeples, there is also a new “Phantom” meeples mini-expansion.  Inside this clear meeple-shaped case are enough pieces for up to six players and a new “phantom” rule set.  Finally, a new anniversary edition of the Carcassonne Dice Game has also shipped.  It comes in a quaint meeple-shaped tin, as well, and includes a pad, pencil, and the rule booklet.

One of two Godzilla-related games that came in today, Godzilla Stomp! is a card based game where players choose control of either Godzilla, Mothra, Mechagodzilla, Battra, or Destoroyah and battle to see who destroys the most buildings through fighting or rampaging.  Simple destruction, what could be better?

Second up, is Godzilla, Kaiju World Wars.  Basically, a grander, boardgame version of Godzilla Stomp!, players choose from Godzilla, Rodan, Gigan, or King Ghidorah.  From there you choose one of the many scenarios contained in the game and begin crushing buildings, fighting off the army, and battling other monsters.  Each creature has special abilities that they can whip out when needed.

Don’t call it an expansion!  The Struggle for Catan Card Game follows in the footsteps of the previous Rivals of Catan that made for two to four players.  Working off of the mechanics popularized by the Settlers of Catan boardgame, Struggle has players managing resources as they build cities, knights, roads, and so forth.  The twist is that certain roads and knights can change hands.  As usual, the first player to ten victory points gets the win.

An important restock note, Citadels has come back in stock.  That is all.  No, wait, that’s not all.  There’s also two new sets of prepainted miniatures (in the vein of the Arkham Horror miniatures from a couple months back) for City of Thieves.  If you’ve played the game, you know that the miniatures included in it are gorgeously sculpted, but lack a nifty paint job.  These are equally well sculpted, but also are painted to match.  Plus, there is one special miniature not included in the game called the Duke of Cadwallon that introduces a new rule set to the game.

Last but nowhere near least.  Like, miles away.  Like, here’s least and way over there on the moon is this.  That this is the new Dominion expansion Cornucopia.  This is not a stand alone game like base Dominion or Intrigue, but it adds a completely new element of play.  That element is a reward for variety; the more types of cards in your hand, the more you gain.  If you have the cards that allow such a thing, though.  Dominion really needs no introduction at this point, so we’ll leave it at that.